1. http://longfordlocal.com/peggy-nolan-interview-local-election-series/

    Peggy Nolan has being an elected member to Local Government in Longford for the past 15 years, and it came as no surprise that she had plenty to say when she sat down with Johnny Fallon recently to discuss her campaign for re-election in May.

  2. http://longfordlocal.com/seamus-butler-interview-local-election-series/

    Longford businessman Seamus Butler is running for re-election to Longford County Council in the Local Government Elections in May. Johnny Fallon spoke to him recently at the Backstage Theatre, as part of the Longford Local Interview Series .

  3. Watch Johnny Fallon interview Cllr Gerry Warnock . Our #Longford Local Election Series begins. http://longfordlocal.com/gerry-warnock-interview-longford-local-elections 

  4. http://longfordlocal.com/gerry-warnock-interview-longford-local-elections Current Longford Town Councillor, and local election candidate Gerry Warnock sat down with Johnny Fallon to discuss a range of topics related to his campaign for the May 23rd Local Government Elections. [Follow the link to see the full video]

    http://longfordlocal.com/gerry-warnock-interview-longford-local-elections Current Longford Town Councillor, and local election candidate Gerry Warnock sat down with Johnny Fallon to discuss a range of topics related to his campaign for the May 23rd Local Government Elections. [Follow the link to see the full video]

  5. Our agency services include professional photo-shoots.

    Our agency services include professional photo-shoots.

  6. ‘Bad Blood’ by Lorne Patterson to be launched this Wednesday,  December 4th

By Audrey Healy
Next Wednesday December 4th sees the launch of ‘Bad Blood’, a new book written by one of County Longford’s most talented writers, Lorne Patterson, who last year published ‘Witch’. This week he is excited and proud – as he should be – about the birth of his new book as he takes time out to talk to longfordlocal.com about his new writing career.
“I grew up in a family of readers and I remain a devourer of books. Also, my father was a professional writer. I’ve always enjoyed creative writing, and had the encouragement of a number of good friends to keep at it. However, it wasn’t really until I came to County Longford and availed of the many local supports – writers groups, workshops, readings, festivals, a writer-in-residence- that my writing took off.”
Lorne’s first work ‘Witch’ remains very special to him and he looks back on it with pride. “The book is a story of two Scottish witch hunts, separated by some four hundred years, that collide in contemporary Scotland. Even though it was published as a horror story – and received favourable reviews as a horror story - I still see it as a dark romance.”
However next week the venue will be The Green in Edgeworthstown which will play host to the launch of his second achievement – the launch of ‘Bad Blood’. He enthusiastically takes up the intriguing story. ‘Bad Blood’ is the story of a man who has been a patient in a psychiatric high-security unit for a long time. When we meet Lenny, the unit is in a state of transition as it moves from the stewardship of one Consultant and an innovative but controversial therapeutic regime, to the control of a new Medical Officer and a contain-and control approach to care. Already disturbed by many aspects of the care he and his fellow patients have been subjected too, Lenny comes into increasing conflict with that regime. Matters come to a head when Lenny’s meddlesome behaviour is deemed by the new Consultant to be evidence of mental illness, requiring more of the shock treatment he fears and loathes. The confrontation becomes physical and the response of those in charge is overwhelming. But Lenny – nicknamed ‘the Professor’ - is a veteran of psychiatric institutions, not easily cowed. 
During his period of medicated seclusion, Lenny broods. ‘Thoughts leaping hot-footed from the grid in my cranium as the swamp juice wears off. Smoky thoughts. Incendiary thoughts.' He concludes that the new regime no longer deserves to control the lives of himself and his incarcerated peers and decides to end that dominance. To achieve that, the Professor secures the assistance of some of his fellow patients 
Even as the clock ticks down to his planned shock treatments, the more authoritarian of the staff take steps to isolate and break their most meddlesome patient. That includes using other patients against the Prof, especially Wilson, a rage-filled sociopath. Lenny is already a focus of Wilson’s malevolence and now Wilson targets Lenny’s friends on the unit. 
As the struggle moves towards its climax both Lenny and his opponents find it difficult to cope. Lenny is forced to confront his own history and the reason that compels him to be so stubborn on behalf of other mental patients. He continues to be tormented too by his fear over his ‘bad blood’, the madness and rage that he believes has been passed to him. The final clash is explosive and unforgiving; the consequences, unexpected. 
‘Bad Blood’ also explores mental illness itself: what it is, who gets to say so, and the types of intervention that can be – that too often have been - imposed on disturbed men and women in the name of ‘care’. 
The book took a staggering ten years to write so Lorne has shown real dedication in keeping at it. “I don’t know how many times I reworked the manuscript. My first book and new story have been more reasonable, about two years each.” 
Who does he hope ‘Bad Blood’ will appeal to?
This, he says is a “tricky” question. “I write for myself. I know my style appeals to some but not to others, but the book might also appeal to people who are interested in the subject matter - mental illness.”
Lorne was a psychiatric nurse for many many years – I ask if his vast experience in this field was useful in his research for the manuscript?
He readily agrees. “A lot of the story is based on my thirty years’ experience as a psychiatric nurse in State institutions, private medicine, and in the community but the issues involved in psychiatric care are often complex as well as controversial, and I tried hard to be balanced as well as accurate.”
Where will the book be available?
The book will be available at the launch for a special price of €9.99. Otherwise, it is available from the Wordsonthestreet Publishers online bookstore, and shortly, in both print and kindle editions, from Amazon. Also, in certain Easons bookshops around the Midlands. 
I ask about the launch?
“It will take place in my home town of Edgeworthstown. Sheila Reilly of the Longford Leader will be launching the book. Part of the money raised on the night will be going to the Edgeworthstown Tidy Town group, a group of local volunteers that strive to make Edgeworthstown a more pleasant place to live in.“
So what’s next in the pipeline for Lorne?
“The sequel to Witch. It’s still centred around two main characters from Witch, Detective Sergeant Jamie McFadden of Strathclyde Police, ex-Army, a divorced, isolated burn-out, and his lover, the Red Witch, his murderous, but oh so wonderful, Maggie. But Hour of the Witch has a much wider scope, as the menace of the past, only partially revealed in Witch, becomes frighteningly present.
Hour of the Witch has a simple premise: the witch hunts failed - now it’s their turn.”
Lorne Patterson is an Edgeworthstown writer and member of the Ballymahon Writers Group. He is a psychiatric nurse and a community educator who has worked in a number of countries, including Britain, the United States and Russia. A past runner-up in the Sean Ó Faoláin short-story competition, he published his first book, Witch, in 2012 to critical acclaim. 
Samples of Lorne’s writing can be found on his website, www.lornepatterson.com.
‘Bad Blood’ will be launched at The Green, Edgeworthstown on Wednesday 4th December 2013 at 7.30p.m.

    ‘Bad Blood’ by Lorne Patterson to be launched this Wednesday,  December 4th

    By Audrey Healy

    Next Wednesday December 4th sees the launch of ‘Bad Blood’, a new book written by one of County Longford’s most talented writers, Lorne Patterson, who last year published ‘Witch’. This week he is excited and proud – as he should be – about the birth of his new book as he takes time out to talk to longfordlocal.com about his new writing career.


    “I grew up in a family of readers and I remain a devourer of books. Also, my father was a professional writer. I’ve always enjoyed creative writing, and had the encouragement of a number of good friends to keep at it. However, it wasn’t really until I came to County Longford and availed of the many local supports – writers groups, workshops, readings, festivals, a writer-in-residence- that my writing took off.”


    Lorne’s first work ‘Witch’ remains very special to him and he looks back on it with pride. “The book is a story of two Scottish witch hunts, separated by some four hundred years, that collide in contemporary Scotland. Even though it was published as a horror story – and received favourable reviews as a horror story - I still see it as a dark romance.”

    However next week the venue will be The Green in Edgeworthstown which will play host to the launch of his second achievement – the launch of ‘Bad Blood’. He enthusiastically takes up the intriguing story.Bad Blood’ is the story of a man who has been a patient in a psychiatric high-security unit for a long time. When we meet Lenny, the unit is in a state of transition as it moves from the stewardship of one Consultant and an innovative but controversial therapeutic regime, to the control of a new Medical Officer and a contain-and control approach to care. Already disturbed by many aspects of the care he and his fellow patients have been subjected too, Lenny comes into increasing conflict with that regime. Matters come to a head when Lenny’s meddlesome behaviour is deemed by the new Consultant to be evidence of mental illness, requiring more of the shock treatment he fears and loathes. The confrontation becomes physical and the response of those in charge is overwhelming. But Lenny – nicknamed ‘the Professor’ - is a veteran of psychiatric institutions, not easily cowed.

    During his period of medicated seclusion, Lenny broods. ‘Thoughts leaping hot-footed from the grid in my cranium as the swamp juice wears off. Smoky thoughts. Incendiary thoughts.' He concludes that the new regime no longer deserves to control the lives of himself and his incarcerated peers and decides to end that dominance. To achieve that, the Professor secures the assistance of some of his fellow patients

    Even as the clock ticks down to his planned shock treatments, the more authoritarian of the staff take steps to isolate and break their most meddlesome patient. That includes using other patients against the Prof, especially Wilson, a rage-filled sociopath. Lenny is already a focus of Wilson’s malevolence and now Wilson targets Lenny’s friends on the unit.

    As the struggle moves towards its climax both Lenny and his opponents find it difficult to cope. Lenny is forced to confront his own history and the reason that compels him to be so stubborn on behalf of other mental patients. He continues to be tormented too by his fear over his ‘bad blood’, the madness and rage that he believes has been passed to him. The final clash is explosive and unforgiving; the consequences, unexpected.

    ‘Bad Blood’ also explores mental illness itself: what it is, who gets to say so, and the types of intervention that can be – that too often have been - imposed on disturbed men and women in the name of ‘care’.

    The book took a staggering ten years to write so Lorne has shown real dedication in keeping at it. “I don’t know how many times I reworked the manuscript. My first book and new story have been more reasonable, about two years each.”

    Who does he hope ‘Bad Blood’ will appeal to?

    This, he says is a “tricky” question. “I write for myself. I know my style appeals to some but not to others, but the book might also appeal to people who are interested in the subject matter - mental illness.”

    Lorne was a psychiatric nurse for many many years – I ask if his vast experience in this field was useful in his research for the manuscript?

    He readily agrees. “A lot of the story is based on my thirty years’ experience as a psychiatric nurse in State institutions, private medicine, and in the community but the issues involved in psychiatric care are often complex as well as controversial, and I tried hard to be balanced as well as accurate.”

    Where will the book be available?

    The book will be available at the launch for a special price of €9.99. Otherwise, it is available from the Wordsonthestreet Publishers online bookstore, and shortly, in both print and kindle editions, from Amazon. Also, in certain Easons bookshops around the Midlands.

    I ask about the launch?

    “It will take place in my home town of Edgeworthstown. Sheila Reilly of the Longford Leader will be launching the book. Part of the money raised on the night will be going to the Edgeworthstown Tidy Town group, a group of local volunteers that strive to make Edgeworthstown a more pleasant place to live in.“

    So what’s next in the pipeline for Lorne?

    “The sequel to Witch. It’s still centred around two main characters from Witch, Detective Sergeant Jamie McFadden of Strathclyde Police, ex-Army, a divorced, isolated burn-out, and his lover, the Red Witch, his murderous, but oh so wonderful, Maggie. But Hour of the Witch has a much wider scope, as the menace of the past, only partially revealed in Witch, becomes frighteningly present.

    Hour of the Witch has a simple premise: the witch hunts failed - now it’s their turn.”

    Lorne Patterson is an Edgeworthstown writer and member of the Ballymahon Writers Group. He is a psychiatric nurse and a community educator who has worked in a number of countries, including Britain, the United States and Russia. A past runner-up in the Sean Ó Faoláin short-story competition, he published his first book, Witch, in 2012 to critical acclaim.

    Samples of Lorne’s writing can be found on his website, www.lornepatterson.com.

    ‘Bad Blood’ will be launched at The Green, Edgeworthstown on Wednesday 4th December 2013 at 7.30p.m.

  7. Jude Flynn publishes another edition of ‘Fireside Tales’

    image

    Last Thursday November 28th saw well known face around Longford, Jude Flynn, published his 11th edition of the popular series of ‘Fireside Tales’ – the ideal Christmas present this year.

    The much loved Leitrim man, who has adopted Longford as his home town for many years was in fine fettle in County Longford Library and attracted a record crowd as many gathered to celebrate this astounding achievement in the presence of many Councillors and public representatives.

    Addressing those present, County Longford Librarian Mary Carlton Reynolds paid tribute to Jude for what she now describes as “an annual event”, the publication of another edition of ‘Fireside Tales’. “We have had many book launches throughout the year in Longford which has been described as the third best County in Ireland for organising Gatherings – but I have to say the launch of Jude’s book is always one of our favourites!,” she said to much applause.

    “Jude does all his own research, gathers all the information, designs the book and prints it himself and we in Longford owe him a great deal of gratitude for what he does and the information and stories he preserves in print. Jude has a great sense of pride in his own place and money can’t buy that,” she stressed.

    Mayor of County Longford Larry Bannon pointed out that the new publication of the eleventh edition of ‘Fireside Tales’ was clearly “a labour of love” for Jude and that he was doing “a great service to the people of Longford town and county in recording history and storing stories which would be otherwise forgotten.” “There is something here for everyone in this book,” he concluded “and though Jude says his next book will be his last, “I have no doubt that we will all be gathered here in years to come celebrating the launch of more.”

    Performing the launch of the book itself was RTE Midlands Correspondent and Lanesboro native Ciaran Mullooly who conceded that his own literary career “pales into insignifance” when compared with Jude who he described as “prolific”. “When I worked in Longford 720 years ago I remember Jude writing plays at the time and that was way back in the eighties,!” he laughed. “Jude”, he continued, “is actually unique in carrying out a great service to the community in recording the folklore and heritage of the many parishes throughout the area. He is effectively retracing stories from the grave to the archives and it is tremendous and will go on and on. It is a wonderful success story and I would also like to thank Jude on a personal level because he once interviewed my Uncle and afterwards he sent me a cassette of the interview without being asked to, just silently sent it to me in an envelope and every now and then I listen to it and that’s him – no fuss. It’s a gift for life. He’s a gentleman.”

    In his speech the ever modest and unassuming Jude said that the compliments uttered by those who has taken to the microphone before him had been “exaggerated” and he confirmed that next year’s 12th book would be his last.

    He went on to tell a series of funny stories and jokes that warmed people to him and gave those present a taste of the book which will no doubt be in many Christmas stocking’s this year.

    ‘Fireside Tales’ is available in all local bookshops now at a price of EUR20.00

  8. Colmcille Christmas Market 2013 

    Raising funds for local Palliative Care Services

    A fabulous array of local crafts, baked goods, fashion items and more will be available for viewing and sale on December 8th at the Colmcille Community Centre for their annual Christmas Market, which will be raising much needed funds for local Palliative Care services.

    More from the local committee below. Make sure to put it in your diary and pick up some items on the day ! 

    Event Details

    Last year Colmcille Ladies football club ran a bake sale to fundraise for the club, it was a huge success and it was agreed to make it an annual event.  This year however we received an outstanding amount of support from our community and we wanted to do something to show how much we appreciated their support.

    We decided therefore that we would run our Christmas sale in association with a charity this year.  It was decided to team up with Palliative care as it is close to many peoples hearts and provides much needed support to those who need it most.

    The Colmcille Christmas Market will take place on Sunday, 8th of December at 11am (after mass) in Colmcille community centre.

     Along with our bake sale, this year we have rented out a number of tables to local crafters so as to make the event more community orientated. We will have the following present on the day:

    1. Woodturning and wood crafts, which include lamps, bowls, jewellery boxes, birdhouses and lots more also a selection of handmade cards.

    2. Christmas cake stall - decorated Christmas cakes of all sizes will be available to buy on the day

    3. Crochet - a selection of one off pieces of crochet will be on sale, including hats, scarves and baby items

    4. Tupperware - a wide selection of Tupperware items will be on display

    5. Hair care - a local salon will be selling gift sets and vouchers on the day

    6. A young local artist creates beautiful drawings from photographs and she will be displaying her work on the day

    7. We will also have a stall selling unique handmade handbags

    8. Our local florist will have a selection of long lasting Christmas centre pieces for sale

    9. Our club will be selling Christmas wreaths and logs, as with the bake sale, all proceeds will be shared between the club and palliative care

    10. There will be an arts and crafts table selling prescious gifts and stocking fillers for Christmas

    11. Handmade hats and fascinators will also be displayed and sold at the market

    We are also hosting a demonstration on Christmas floral arrangements and on cake decorating.

    We will be serving refreshments on the day and there will be a seating area.

  9. “Chorus Angelorum launched”

    The Sacred Music of St. Mel’s Cathedral 1856 – 2013

    By Audrey Healy. Photos Tiernan Dolan

    It’s often been said that when you sing, you pray and it’s true to say that for one hundred and fifty seven years the choirs of St. Mel’s Cathedral have been doing just that – and doing it in style!

    Last Friday evening the history and glorious achievements of the many choirs who have sang their hearts out in St. Mel’s were celebrated in print and pictures through the pages of fhe spectacular new publication that has recently been produced by the Parish Communications Group of St. Mel’s Cathedral.

    “Chorus Angelorum – The Sacred Music of St. Mel’s Cathedral 1856 – 2013” was launched on Friday 22nd November at 8.00 pm in St. Mel’s Cathedral Centre by the new Bishop of Ardagh and Clonmacnoise Francis Duffy, in the presence of a large gathering including his predecessor former Bishop Colm O’Reilly, who was just last week awarded the Freedom of Longford.

    As part of the beautiful ceremony those in attendance in the beautifully adorned centre were treated to the music of no less than three choirs from the region. St. Joseph’s Folk Group, under the direction of Catherine Corkery, performed ‘Christ be our Light’, followed by an Instrumental piece and then the now infamous Clouds Veil by Fr. Liam Lawton which has become so well know throughout the world.

    St. Mel’s Cathedral Choir were next and under the direction of Fintan Farrelly performed ‘O Sacrum Convivium’, ‘Ave Maria’ and A Clare Benediction’, while the final piece, to rapturous applause, came from St. Mel’s Cathedral Folk 

    Group, who are directed by Fr. Brendan O’Sullivan. They sang The Lord is my Shepherd, ‘Vive Jesu El Senore’ and a hauntingly beautiful rendition of the late Christy Hennessy’s ‘Remember Me’.

    Since 1856 a great many people have contributed generously as organists, choir members, musicians and soloists leading the parish community in praying through sacred music. This impressive 144 page illustrated history book honours the contribution of so many down through the years. 

    In his address Bishop Francis Duffy paid tribute to all those involved in the choirs, past and present, making a special mention to Fr. Tommy Devine who was a late vocation to the priesthood and an organist in St. Mel’s. He congratulated the communications group on the ‘Chorus Angelorum’ publication and wished all those in choirs well for the future.

    This beautifully artistic volume has been designed by Noel Strange and celebrates the commitment of all with a trove of photographs, stories from past years, poems and songs and we anticipate that these will evoke wonderful memories for many people.

    “Chorus Angelorum – The Sacred Music of St. Mel’s Cathedral 1856 - 2013” will be on sale after Masses at St. Mel’s Cathedral Centre for the next two Sundays, at The Presbytery, Longford and at a select number of stores in Longford.

  10. Club Notes - UCL Harps FC - Nov 25th

    Match Reports:

    Did you hear about the pound coin thrown onto the pitch at Ibrox? Scottish police are still trying to determine whether it was a missile or a takeover bid!  No such uncertainty though regarding the value of the boys and girls of UCL HARPS FC. They proved, yet again, to be worth their weight in gold by putting in a hard week of training and, with the support of their managers and supporters, they went out and did the club proud this past weekend. Here’s how they got on:

    U15s:

    From the first whistle UCL Wildcats in their 3rd game of the season pounced on Castlepollard. With an impressive display of confidence and teamwork, the girls never let go of their prey, finishing off the game with a well deserved 7 - 1 victory. Goal Scorers: Ciara Cadam; Megan Jobe; Andrea Farrell; Leah Brady; Katie Sheridan.

    Manager: Alison Jobe & Michael Masterson

    U14s:

    UCL Hawks had a fantastic game against Abbey Rovers on Sunday. With a full squad the boys played to the very best of their potential displaying skilful and confident football skills. They won the game 5 - 3. Goal Scorers: Joseph Hagen (4); Eoin Hawkins (1).  Well done Lads! Special thanks to Kevin Kilbride for helping out with the Hawks on Sunday.

    Manager: Alison Jobe

    U13s:

    UCL Foxes displayed all the skill and effort any up and coming team should, displaying great passing and ball control and showing ease and comfort in their positions against Gaels Utd on Saturday.  The final score didn’t really reflect the work rate put in by the whole team.  UCL 1, Gaels United 2. Goal Scorer: Mya Murtagh. Full team:  Mya Murtagh, Karen McLoughlin, Nessa Farley, Nicole McNally, Lana McGahren, Gemma Healy, Clodagh Duffy.

    Manager: Alison Jobe and Michael Masterson


    As with the UCL Foxes, sometimes the final score doesn’t reflect how a match was played. Such was the case this past weekend when UCL Buffalos lost 2 - 0 to Stonepark. Despite the final result, the lads should be proud of themselves after having put in a huge effort and delivering a fine performance - their best of the season with many of the spectators agreeing that the Buffalos deserved to come away with at least a draw.

    Manager: Alison Jobe.

    U12s:

    What are they feeding those sharks? Despite being short a couple of players, UCL Sharks recorded another great team performance and continued their seemingly unstoppable campaign with a convincing victory over Castlepollard Celtics on Sunday.

    Manager: Enda Boylan.

    U11S:

    UCL Dolphins were at home to Ardagh on Saturday. In a great match which was really well supported by both teams (thank you mums & dads) the girls played their hearts out in a real end to end game and really tried their best throughout the whole match.  Final score UCL Dolphins 1, Ardagh 5. Full team:  Eleanor Lynch, Jessica Pratt, Caitlin O Reilly, Lauren & Rosien O Reilly, Emily O Reilly, Shauna Reilly, Kate Madden, Elianna Madden.

    Manager: Alison Jobe.

    U9s:

    After a couple of weeks rest and with time to sharpen their claws, UCL Tigers were let loose in Drumlish on Sunday. They sprang out from their cage and, from the get-go, did not disappoint. With a great team performance and goals from 5 of the team, the Tigers finished off Gaels United Lions (ironically) with a final whistle score of 7 - 1.

    Manager: John Patten.

    Training:

    Training for all players continues at the usual times.

    Newly Qualified Referee:

    UCL HARPS FC is delighted to welcome Jessica Healy as its newest qualified referee. She refereed the U9 game in Drumlish on Sunday. The club wishes her every success in her new role!


    UCL HARPS FC Weekly Notes

    UCL HARPS FC notes are sent out by email on a weekly basis to a mailing list made up from the email addresses supplied by parents/guardians at registration. If you would like for others to be added to the mailing list, please send their email address to Eddie Ward (contact details below)

    News/Information

    We would like to see our club notes being as informative and entertaining as possible. So if you have any news, information or achievement you would like to see highlighted in the UCL HARPS FC Notes Page, please contact Eddie Ward as follows: Tel: (086) 380-1152 or by email: eddie.ward@hse.ie

  11. A snippet from this evening’s event at the Backstage Theater, to honor the organisers and supporters of The #Longford Gathering and to launch the new Explore Longford app by Longford County Council for Longford Tourism. 

    MC on the evening was Joe Flaherty from the Longford Leader, describing Longford as “One of the most open, inviting and welcoming counties in Ireland” and said that it was a success “because the people of Longford wanted it to succeed”. 

    Cllr Larry Bannon paid tribute to all involved, remarking on the fact that there were 130 officially organised Gathering events in Longford this year and welcomed the launch of the new tourism app. 

    Jim Miley, CEO of The Gathering, said that in addition to a ten fold increase in the number of expected gathering events nationally (5,000 as opposed to an initial estimate of 500), Longford ranked number 3 in terms of the number of gathering events per head of population.

    A performance of Irish music was followed by a number of representatives from various Longford Gathering events coming on stage to talk about their experiences.

    Geraldine Kane from the Kane Clan Gathering spoke about the impact it had on her extended family when close relatives from Britain, The US and further afield arrived home after many years absence.

    Michael Masterson from Dromard remarked on the “Mow Pat Murphy’s Meadow” event in Dromard and in particular about the restoration of “Nanny Duffy’s Cottage” at Moyne and how it drew such interest from places such as Germany and the US with visitors going out of their way to see the fantastic restoration works first hand. 

    Joan-Killian Gallagher spoke also of the restoration of her ancestral home near Lanesborough and the special significance is has with it’s close relationship with Notre Dame University in the US.

    Pauline Flood from Edgeworthtown recited two poems that signified many of the best aspects of Gathering events in Longford and further afield, with backing music that of beautiful fiddle playing by Aisling Reilly from Mostrim. 

    Moving on to the launch of the new tourism app, Cllr John Duffy introduced it to all those in attendance, explaining it’s features such as audio tours of over 50 tourism locations of interest in the county. 

    Longford town Mayor Cllr Paul O’Connell said “Longford has a lot to be proud of” and encouraged everyone to spread the message about the app.

    Joe Flaherty brought the evening’s proceedings to a close and many present retired to the bar at Slasher’s Complex next-door to take the proceedings to the next stage :)

  12. Bishop Colm O’Reilly awarded Freedom of Longford

    Former Bishop of Ardagh and Clonmacnois Colm O’Reilly was bestowed a great honour by his community last evening [Monday, Nov 19th 2013] when he was awarded the Freedom of Longford.

    The 78 year old resigned from his post as Bishop of Ardagh and Clonmacnoise earlier this year after thirty years at the helm and was subsequently succeeded by Bishop Francis Duffy.

    Article - Audrey Healy | Photos - Michael Croghan

    The decision to award him the freedom of the County was originally put forward by Longford County Mayor Larry Bannon at a recent meeting of Longford Council and unanimously supported by his chamber colleagues.

    Speaking at the official ceremony, which took place in the Council Chamber in Longford Town, Mayor Larry Bannon paid tribute to the Bishop for his “care and compassion to the people of Longford”, and in particular to the associations of ACCORD, St. Christopher’s and St. Vincent de Paul.

    Addressing the gathering which was attended by members of Longford Council Council and current Bishop of Ardagh of Diocese and Clonmacnoise, Bishop O’Reilly said, “It is a great honour for me to receive this award here tonight – I am only the fourth person to do so – and the first cleric. Having spent so much time in Longford I have a special attachment to my native County and if I had received the award in another place, though it would also be very much appreciated and welcome it would not mean as much.”

    As the date of reopening St. Mel’s Cathedral for Midnight Mass on Christmas Eve 2014 draws ever closer, the much loved cleric spoke of those first few emotive days after that horrific event – and a strange occurrence which preceded it. “I have so many painful memories of that day in 2009 and have suffered many troubled sleepless nights. One of the thoughts going through my mind has always been ‘why should it happen to me?’ However I think about it more positively now and see it now, not as the end of a painful journey but the beginning of a new phase of a new life.”

    He went on to recall something deeply personal which drew parallels with the Cathedral inferno. “I was in the city of Narobi in 1993 where I had occasion to visit for my brother’s illness. I became ill and was admitted to hospital on 23rd May for ten days when I had this horrendous nightmare in which the Cathedral was completely destroyed! The statues were gone and there was debris everywhere, it was so realistic, I couldn’t believe how this could happen to me and when the actual event happened in 2009 the devastation of that nightmare flashed back to me in my mind, it was so real. However I have put it all behind me now and God willing what’s ahead is happiness.”

    The popular cleric joins a select number of other well known people who have been awarded the honour - former Taoiseach Albert Reynolds, ex-county manager Michael Killeen and then GAA Director General Liam Mulvihill.

     

  13. “Chorus Angelorum” The Sacred Music of St. Mel’s Cathedral 1856 – 2013

    The Parish Communications Group of St. Mel’s Cathedral are delighted to announce the launch of “Chorus Angelorum – The Sacred Music of St. Mel’s Cathedral 1856 – 2013”on Friday 22nd November at 8.00 pm in St. Mel’s Cathedral Centre, Longford. The book will be launched by Bishop Francis Duffy with all three parish choirs performing some of their favourite pieces.

    Since 1856 a great many people have contributed generously as organists, choir members, musicians and soloists leading the parish community in praying through sacred music. This 144 page illustrated history book honours the contribution of so many down through the years.

    This beautifully artistic volume designed by Noel Strange, celebrates the commitment of all with a trove of photographs, stories from past years, poems and songs and we anticipate that these will evoke wonderful memories for many people.

     St. Augustine said “Singing is for one who loves,” and there is also an ancient proverb: “Whoever sings well prays twice over.” In celebrating the contribution of the parish choirs, we recognise the importance place of music in our worship. As well look forward to our restored Cathedral in the not too distant future, may we continue to ‘Sing a new song to the Lord, for he has worked wonders.’

    All are welcome to attend. Refreshments will be served.

     “Chorus Angelorum – The Sacred Music of St. Mel’s Cathedral 1856 – 2013” will be on sale on the night @ €10. It will also be available after Masses at St. Mel’s Cathedral Centre for the follow two Sundays and at The Presbytery, Longford.